TL;DR

Status

Details

Partnership

 

Thank you for your support!

 

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What is a Hackathon?

A Policy Hackathon is an event where teams are given a case study outlining a policy problem and given a limited amount of time to come up with policy solutions to that problem. Their recommendations are then evaluated by a panel of judges, and a winner is declared. By their nature and structure, Policy Hackathons create space for imagining innovative policy solutions while also building people’s capacity to work in the policy field.

The hackathon we hosted in the Summer of 2022 explored a youth-focused approach to an orientation to the First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum Framework (FNMWCF).

What is the First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum Framework (FNMWCF)?

 

 

The First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum Framework (FNMWCF) is a national framework that addresses mental wellness among First Nations in a culturally strengths-based and coordinated approach.

The framework was developed through collaboration between the Assembly of First Nations, Indigenous Services Canada, Thunderbird Partnership Foundation, First People’s Wellness Circle as well as other community mental health leaders.

 

 

 

To better support the implementation of the framework, this group of partners, now formalized as an Implementation Team, is developing a comprehensive orientation helpful to those who work in this field or in associated sectors such as the social determinants of health.

 

 

 

One of the key groups that the Implementation Team hopes to engage with and support through orientation is partners who work with youth. With this in mind, a specifically youth-focused dialogue (in this case through the Hackathon) is envisioned to develop a youth-focused approach to an orientation to the FNMWCF.

 

 

 

FNMWCF Hackathon Summer 2022

Participants worked collaboratively in a supportive virtual learning environment to increase their policy capacity in critical analysis, innovation, and advocacy efforts. Learning from policy experts and peers, and with the support from mentors and guidance from CRE staff, participants received the tools to deconstruct topical policy issues that are impacting Indigenous communities in Canada. Most importantly, had fun while doing it!

 

This hackathon explored:

     

      • Youth priorities in mental health

      • Intersections between youth priorities and the FNMWCF

      • What youth need orientation on regarding the FNMWCF

    Flip through our wrap-up report for some of the highlights:

    Graphic Recording by @michelle_cassyex

     

     

    Partnership

     

    Thank you for your support!

     

    [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

     

     

     

    What is a Hackathon?

    A Policy Hackathon is an event where teams are given a case study outlining a policy problem and given a limited amount of time to come up with policy solutions to that problem. Their recommendations are then evaluated by a panel of judges, and a winner is declared. By their nature and structure, Policy Hackathons create space for imagining innovative policy solutions while also building people’s capacity to work in the policy field.

    The hackathon we hosted in the Summer of 2022 explored a youth-focused approach to an orientation to the First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum Framework (FNMWCF).

    What is the First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum Framework (FNMWCF)?

     

     

    The First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum Framework (FNMWCF) is a national framework that addresses mental wellness among First Nations in a culturally strengths-based and coordinated approach.

    The framework was developed through collaboration between the Assembly of First Nations, Indigenous Services Canada, Thunderbird Partnership Foundation, First People’s Wellness Circle as well as other community mental health leaders.

     

     

     

    To better support the implementation of the framework, this group of partners, now formalized as an Implementation Team, is developing a comprehensive orientation helpful to those who work in this field or in associated sectors such as the social determinants of health.

     

     

     

    One of the key groups that the Implementation Team hopes to engage with and support through orientation is partners who work with youth. With this in mind, a specifically youth-focused dialogue (in this case through the Hackathon) is envisioned to develop a youth-focused approach to an orientation to the FNMWCF.

     

     

     

    FNMWCF Hackathon Summer 2022

    Participants worked collaboratively in a supportive virtual learning environment to increase their policy capacity in critical analysis, innovation, and advocacy efforts. Learning from policy experts and peers, and with the support from mentors and guidance from CRE staff, participants received the tools to deconstruct topical policy issues that are impacting Indigenous communities in Canada. Most importantly, had fun while doing it!

     

    This hackathon explored:

     

      • Youth priorities in mental health

      • Intersections between youth priorities and the FNMWCF

      • What youth need orientation on regarding the FNMWCF

    Flip through our wrap-up report for some of the highlights:

    Graphic Recording by @michelle_cassyex

     

     

    Partnership

     

    Thank you for your support!

     

    For More Information

    Megan Lewis

    (She/Her)

    Director of the Centre for Indigenous Policy & Research

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